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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 750963, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/750963
Research Article

Antiaging Effect of Pine Pollen in Human Diploid Fibroblasts and in a Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose

1Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab of Geriatrics, Zhejiang Hospital, 12 Lingyin Road, Hangzhou 310013, China
2Zhejiang Forestry Academy, Hangzhou 310023, China

Received 2 December 2011; Revised 10 February 2012; Accepted 14 February 2012

Academic Editor: Guilherme Antonio Behr

Copyright © 2012 Gen-Xiang Mao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present paper was designed to investigate the effect of pine pollen against aging in human diploid fibroblast 2BS cells and in an accelerated aging model, which was established by subcutaneous injections with D-galactose daily for 8 weeks in C57BL/6J mice. Pine pollen (1 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL) is proved to delay the replicative senescence of 2BS cells as evidenced by enhanced cell proliferation, decreased SA-β-Gal activity, and reversed expression of senescence-associated molecular markers, such as p53, p 2 1 W a f 1 , p 1 6 I N K 4 a , PTEN, and p 2 7 K i p 1 in late PD cells. Besides, pine pollen reversed D-galactose-induced aging effects in neural activity and inflammatory cytokine levels, as indicated by improved memory latency time and reduced error rate in step-down test and decreased concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α in model mice. Similar to the role of AGEs (advanced glycation endproducts) formation inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG), pine pollen inhibited D-galactose-induced increment of AGEs levels thus reversed the aging phenotypes in model mice. Furthermore, the declined antioxidant activity was obviously reversed upon pine pollen treatment, which may account for its inhibitory effect on nonenzymatic glycation (NEG) in vivo. Our finding presents pine pollen as an attractive agent with potential to retard aging and attenuate age-related diseases in humans.