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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 756132, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/756132
Review Article

Oxidants, Antioxidants, and the Beneficial Roles of Exercise-Induced Production of Reactive Species

1Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Science, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Department of Morphology, Institute of Biological Sciences (UFMG); and Santa Casa de Misericórdia, 30150-221 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK

Received 16 March 2012; Accepted 2 April 2012

Academic Editor: Michalis G. Nikolaidis

Copyright © 2012 Elisa Couto Gomes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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