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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 914273, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/914273
Review Article

Dietary Polyphenols as Modulators of Brain Functions: Biological Actions and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Their Beneficial Effects

Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK

Received 19 February 2012; Accepted 30 March 2012

Academic Editor: Tullia Maraldi

Copyright © 2012 David Vauzour. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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