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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 104308, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/104308
Review Article

Nrf2 and Cardiovascular Defense

Laboratory of Systems Physiology, Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA

Received 11 January 2013; Revised 15 March 2013; Accepted 19 March 2013

Academic Editor: Hye-Youn Cho

Copyright © 2013 Reuben Howden. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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