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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 157240, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/157240
Review Article

Red Orange: Experimental Models and Epidemiological Evidence of Its Benefits on Human Health

1Section of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of G.F. Ingrassia, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia No. 85-95123, Catania, Italy
2Section of Biochemistry, Department of Drug Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
3Department of Biology, Piemonte Orientale University, Alessandria, Italy
4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
5Section of Pharmacology and Biochemistry, Department of Clinical and Molecular Biomedicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
6Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy
7Department of Agri-Food and Environmental Systems and Management (DIGESA), University of Catania, Catania, Italy

Received 27 February 2013; Accepted 10 April 2013

Academic Editor: Narasimham L. Parinandi

Copyright © 2013 Giuseppe Grosso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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