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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 374963, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/374963
Review Article

Reactive Oxygen Species in Vascular Formation and Development

1Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003, China
2Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ, UK

Received 2 November 2012; Revised 29 December 2012; Accepted 29 December 2012

Academic Editor: Sumitra Miriyala

Copyright © 2013 Yijiang Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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