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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 580710, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/580710
Review Article

Pituitary Adenoma Nitroproteomics: Current Status and Perspectives

1Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
2Hunan Engineering Laboratory for Structural Biology and Drug Design, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
3State Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Anticancer Drugs, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
4The Charles B. Stout Neuroscience Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 847 Monroe Avenue, Memphis, TN 38163, USA

Received 2 December 2012; Accepted 14 January 2013

Academic Editor: Manikandan Panchatcharam

Copyright © 2013 Xianquan Zhan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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