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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 817807, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/817807
Review Article

Diversity of Mitochondrial Pathology in a Mouse Model of Axonal Degeneration in Synucleinopathies

1Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Sciences, 2-1-6 Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-0057, Japan
2Division of Animal Sciences, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 1-2 Ohwashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8634, Japan
3Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8602, Japan

Received 14 December 2012; Accepted 18 February 2013

Academic Editor: Grzegorz A. Czapski

Copyright © 2013 Akio Sekigawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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