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Prostate Cancer
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 580318, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/580318
Review Article

Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

1Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA
2Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
4University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL 33136, USA
5Texas Oncology and U.S. Oncology Research, Houston, TX 77060, USA

Received 15 June 2011; Accepted 1 September 2011

Academic Editor: Craig Robson

Copyright © 2011 Costantine Albany et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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