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Prostate Cancer
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 323296, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/323296
Research Article

Intake of Grains and Dietary Fiber and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness by Race

1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
2Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
3Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
4Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
5School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
6Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
7Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
8David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 7 June 2012; Accepted 12 October 2012

Academic Editor: Lynnette Ferguson

Copyright © 2012 Fred Tabung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. To examine the associations among intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber and aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African Americans (AA, ) and European Americans (EA, ) in a population-based, case-only study (The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project, PCaP). Methods. Prostate cancer aggressiveness was categorized as high, intermediate or low based on Gleason grade, PSA level and clinical stage. Dietary intake was assessed utilizing the NCI Diet History Questionnaire. Logistic regression (comparing high to intermediate/low aggressive cancers) and polytomous regression with adjustment for potential confounders were used to determine odds of high prostate cancer aggressiveness with intake of refined grains, whole grains and dietary fiber from all sources. Results. An inverse association with aggressive prostate cancer was observed in the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of total fiber intake (OR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50–0.97 and OR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40–0.93, resp.) as compared to the lowest tertile of intake. In the race-stratified analyses, inverse associations were observed in the 3rd tertile of total fiber intake for EA (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23–0.87) and the 2nd tertile of intake for AA (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35–0.95). Conclusions. Dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with aggressive prostate cancer among both AA and EA men.