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Prostate Cancer
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 327104, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/327104
Review Article

Personalized Management in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer: The Role of Biomarkers

1Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert-Grooteplein Zuid 10, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2Department of Urology, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jl. Diponegoro no. 71, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia

Received 25 October 2012; Accepted 28 November 2012

Academic Editor: Anthony Devasia

Copyright © 2012 Siebren Dijkstra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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