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Prostate Cancer
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 157103, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/157103
Review Article

HMGB1: A Promising Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois, 1601 Parkview Avenue, Rockford, IL 61107, USA
2Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA

Received 28 February 2013; Accepted 15 April 2013

Academic Editor: J. W. Moul

Copyright © 2013 Munirathinam Gnanasekar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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