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Parkinson’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 424285, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/424285
Research Article

N-Acetyl Cysteine Protects against Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration via Modulation of Redox Status and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Cells

Parkinson's Disorder Research Laboratory, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA

Received 19 July 2012; Accepted 27 August 2012

Academic Editor: José Manuel Fuentes Rodríguez

Copyright © 2012 Prashanth Chandramani Shivalingappa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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