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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 140832, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/140832
Review Article

Early Life Adversity as a Risk Factor for Fibromyalgia in Later Life

Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B2

Received 27 April 2011; Accepted 25 July 2011

Academic Editor: Charles Vierck

Copyright © 2012 Lucie A. Low and Petra Schweinhardt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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