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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 486590, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/486590
Review Article

Fibromyalgia and Depression

1Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, CBNo.7280, 3330 Thurston Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
3Integrated Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
4Department of Anesthesia, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
5Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Received 2 May 2011; Accepted 30 September 2011

Academic Editor: Petra Schweinhardt

Copyright © 2012 Richard H. Gracely et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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