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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 585419, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/585419
Review Article

Neurobiology Underlying Fibromyalgia Symptoms

1Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Room M19, Montreal, QC, Canada H2A 1C1
2Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Room M19, Montreal, QC, Canada H2A 1C1
3Department of Anesthesia, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Room M19, Montreal, QC, Canada H2A 1C1
4Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, CB No. 7280, 3330 Thurston Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Received 27 April 2011; Accepted 23 August 2011

Academic Editor: Muhammad B. Yunus

Copyright © 2012 Marta Ceko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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