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Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 201858, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/201858
Research Article

Impact of Bee Species and Plant Density on Alfalfa Pollination and Potential for Gene Flow

USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Vegetable Crops Research Unit, Department of Entomology, 1630 Linden Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA

Received 15 September 2009; Accepted 1 December 2009

Academic Editor: James C. Nieh

Copyright © 2010 Johanne Brunet and Christy M. Stewart. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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