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Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 536430, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/536430
Research Article

Ambient Air Temperature Does Not Predict whether Small or Large Workers Forage in Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens)

1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK

Received 12 August 2009; Accepted 6 October 2009

Academic Editor: James C. Nieh

Copyright © 2010 Margaret J. Couvillon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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