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Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 851947, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/851947
Research Article

Floral Resources and Nesting Requirements of the Ground-Nesting Social Bee, Lasioglossum malachurum (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), in a Mediterranean Semiagricultural Landscape

1Dipartimento di Biologia, Sezione di Zoologia e Citologia, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milano, Italy
2Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano, Italy
3Laboratorio di Palinologia e Paleoecologia, Istituto per la Dinamica dei Processi Ambiental, Consiglio Nazionale Ricerche, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano, Italy

Received 24 July 2009; Accepted 11 December 2009

Academic Editor: Claus Rasmussen

Copyright © 2010 Carlo Polidori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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