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Psyche
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 342157, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/342157
Editorial

Ants and Their Parasites

1Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, CNRS-UMR 5169, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09, France
2Departamento de Entomología Tropical, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Avenida Centenario Km. 5.5, AP 424, 77014 Chetumal, QRoo, Mexico
3IRBI, UMR CNRS 7261, Faculté des Sciences, Université François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France
4Department Biologie II, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Großhaderner Straße 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried, Germany

Received 23 February 2012; Accepted 23 February 2012

Copyright © 2012 Jean-Paul Lachaud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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