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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 725237, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/725237
Review Article

Myrmica Ants and Their Butterfly Parasites with Special Focus on the Acoustic Communication

Department of Animal and Human Biology, University of Turin, via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin, Italy

Received 30 September 2011; Accepted 18 December 2011

Academic Editor: Jean Paul Lachaud

Copyright © 2012 F. Barbero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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