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Sarcoma
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 153640, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/153640
Review Article

Can Bone Tissue Engineering Contribute to Therapy Concepts after Resection of Musculoskeletal Sarcoma?

1Regenerative Medicine Group, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4049, Australia
2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, König-Ludwig-Haus, Orthopaedic Center for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg, Brettreich Straße 11, 97072 Würzburg, Germany
3Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
4Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675 Munich, Germany
5Experimental Trauma Surgery, Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675 Munich, Germany
6Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675 Munich, Germany
7The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Ferst Drive Northwest, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA

Received 16 October 2012; Accepted 10 December 2012

Academic Editor: Hans Rechl

Copyright © 2013 Boris Michael Holzapfel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Resection of musculoskeletal sarcoma can result in large bone defects where regeneration is needed in a quantity far beyond the normal potential of self-healing. In many cases, these defects exhibit a limited intrinsic regenerative potential due to an adjuvant therapeutic regimen, seroma, or infection. Therefore, reconstruction of these defects is still one of the most demanding procedures in orthopaedic surgery. The constraints of common treatment strategies have triggered a need for new therapeutic concepts to design and engineer unparalleled structural and functioning bone grafts. To satisfy the need for long-term repair and good clinical outcome, a paradigm shift is needed from methods to replace tissues with inert medical devices to more biological approaches that focus on the repair and reconstruction of tissue structure and function. It is within this context that the field of bone tissue engineering can offer solutions to be implemented into surgical therapy concepts after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcoma. In this paper we will discuss the implementation of tissue engineering concepts into the clinical field of orthopaedic oncology.