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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 384039, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/384039
Research Article

Jumping to Conclusions Is Associated with Paranoia but Not General Suspiciousness: A Comparison of Two Versions of the Probabilistic Reasoning Paradigm

1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
2Department of Management and Economics, Kuehne Logistics University, Hamburg, Germany
3Department of Psychology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

Received 6 August 2012; Accepted 12 September 2012

Academic Editor: Robin Emsley

Copyright © 2012 Steffen Moritz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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