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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 920485, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/920485
Review Article

Schizophrenia as a Disorder of Social Communication

Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Psychiatry 116A, 940 Belmont Street, Brockton, MA 02301, USA

Received 20 December 2011; Revised 23 February 2012; Accepted 21 March 2012

Academic Editor: Margaret A. Niznikiewicz

Copyright © 2012 Cynthia Gayle Wible. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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