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Stem Cells International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 504723, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/504723
Review Article

“Humanized” Stem Cell Culture Techniques: The Animal Serum Controversy

1Frontier Lifeline Pvt. Ltd., TICEL Biopark, Taramani, Chennai 600113, India
2MIT Campus, Anna University, Chromepet, Chennai 600 044, India

Received 9 November 2010; Revised 18 January 2011; Accepted 5 February 2011

Academic Editor: B. Bunnell

Copyright © 2011 Chandana Tekkatte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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