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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 826754, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/826754
Review Article

The Potential for Cellular Therapy Combined with Growth Factors in Spinal Cord Injury

1Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8363 West 3rd Street Ste 800E, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
2Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA

Received 11 June 2012; Revised 19 August 2012; Accepted 28 August 2012

Academic Editor: Stefano Pluchino

Copyright © 2012 Jack Rosner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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