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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 975871, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/975871
Review Article

Markers for Characterization of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells

Academic Unit of the Musculoskeletal Diseases, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK

Received 26 January 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Selim Kuçi

Copyright © 2012 Sally A. Boxall and Elena Jones. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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