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Scientifica
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 152365, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/152365
Review Article

Genetic Aspects of Congenital and Idiopathic Scoliosis

Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705, USA

Received 10 October 2012; Accepted 11 November 2012

Academic Editors: F. Acosta, T. M. George, and S. Rasmussen

Copyright © 2012 Philip F. Giampietro. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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