Table 4: Mean behavioral problems index values and prevalence and unadjusted odds of serious behavioral problems according to ethnic-immigrant status and sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, US children aged 6–17 years: the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (N = 62,804).

CovariateBehavioral problems index1 Serious behavioral problem2
MeanSEP valueWeighted
prevalence (%)3
SEUnadjusted OR95-percent confidence
interval

Total population100.00.2211.760.34
Age (years)
 6–9100.40.36Reference9.790.531.00Reference
 10-11100.50.570.86511.530.881.200.98−1.48
 12–14101.40.430.07412.500.631.321.12−1.55
 15–17 101.10.470.26713.670.741.461.23−1.73
Gender
 Male102.00.31 <0.00113.260.501.351.19−1.53
 Female99.60.32Reference10.190.451.00Reference
Ethnic-immigrant status
 Hispanic children of immigrant parents99.40.99<0.00113.211.555.052.48−10.31
 Hispanic children of US-born parents102.41.03<0.00114.261.555.522.72−11.19
 White children of immigrant parents99.20.89<0.0018.741.163.181.54−6.53
 White children of US-born parents100.90.24<0.00110.130.373.741.92−7.29
 Black children of immigrant parents98.42.180.01212.173.274.601.88−11.23
 Black children of US-born parents102.60.68<0.00116.951.006.773.44−13.32
 Asian children of immigrant parents92.31.10Reference2.930.961.00Reference
 Asian children of US-born parents99.82.410.0049.633.603.531.24−10.07
 Other children of immigrant parents96.22.130.1048.331.963.021.31−6.93
 Other children of US-born parents103.40.82<0.00115.081.565.892.91−11.91
Mother's duration of residence in the US (years)
 <598.72.050.2259.412.880.810.41−1.57
 5–999.01.480.14713.193.101.180.69−2.02
 10–1497.21.530.00910.952.310.950.60−1.53
 15+99.10.880.02111.191.280.980.75−1.27
 US born101.20.24Reference11.410.361.00Reference
Child's race/ethnicity
 Non-Hispanic White100.80.23<0.00110.040.362.491.48−4.19
 Non-Hispanic Black102.20.65<0.00116.460.964.402.58−7.50
 Hispanic100.80.71<0.00113.711.103.542.05−6.12
 American Indian/Alaska native102.71.45<0.00113.762.363.561.86−6.79
 Asian93.81.05Reference4.291.081.00Reference
 Hawaiian/Pacific Islander99.43.020.08014.564.353.801.61−8.97
 Non-Hispanic mixed race102.71.06<0.00113.591.543.511.97−6.24
 Other102.21.81<0.00115.664.034.141.88−9.13
Household composition
 Two-parent biological98.40.26Reference8.040.361.00Reference
 Two-parent stepfamily105.30.74<0.00117.781.272.472.03−3.01
 Single mother105.30.54<0.00118.450.942.592.22−3.02
 Other family type103.30.79<0.00116.781.222.311.90−2.81
Household poverty status (ratio of family income to poverty threshold)
 <100%105.70.68<0.00120.731.103.733.10−4.49
 100–199%102.20.59<0.00114.870.922.492.06−3.02
 200–399%100.30.38<0.00110.030.561.591.34−1.89
 ≥400%97.90.29Reference6.550.401.00Reference
Perceived neighborhood safety
 Unsafe106.10.72<0.00119.891.242.121.79−2.51
 Safe100.00.23Reference10.480.341.00Reference
Television watching (number of hours per day)
 <197.70.42Reference8.100.671.00Reference
 199.40.420.0049.480.591.190.95−1.48
 2101.30.38<0.00111.790.621.521.23−1.87
 >2105.10.55<0.00118.050.852.502.03−3.08
Physical activity (number of days per week)
 0107.80.94<0.00122.901.433.062.54−3.68
 1-2103.90.72<0.00116.271.222.001.64−2.44
 3-4100.70.39<0.00110.910.651.261.07−1.48
 5 or more98.80.28Reference8.840.391.00Reference
Sports participation
 Yes98.80.24Reference8.180.351.00Reference
 No103.80.41<0.00116.880.642.282.01−2.59
Sleep behavior (number of nights child getting adequate sleep during past week)
 0112.01.56<0.00126.692.343.522.74−4.53
 1–4109.80.83<0.00122.231.332.772.32−3.30
 5-6102.80.39<0.00111.510.651.261.08−1.47
 798.10.26Reference9.360.401.00Reference
BMI status of child
 Normal weight (<85th percentile)99.90.28Reference10.370.411.00Reference
 Overweight (85th to <95th percentile)101.30.610.04111.790.751.150.98−1.36
 Obese (≥95th percentile)103.20.52<0.00114.940.861.521.30−1.78

Higher scores on the index indicate higher levels of behavioral problems. 2 This binary outcome variable was defined on the basis of whether or not the child had a BPI score >90th percentile.
3The test for the overall association between each covariate and the prevalence of serious behavioral problems was statistically significant at P < 0.01.