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Scientifica
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 654094, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/654094
Research Article

How Is Chimpanzee Self-Control Influenced by Social Setting?

Language Research Center, Georgia State University, University Plaza, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA

Received 8 June 2012; Accepted 8 July 2012

Academic Editors: D. Boyer and T. L. Maple

Copyright © 2012 Theodore A. Evans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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