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Scientifica
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 217513, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/217513
Review Article

Molecular Cochaperones: Tumor Growth and Cancer Treatment

Division of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 99 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA

Received 11 February 2013; Accepted 1 April 2013

Academic Editors: M. H. Manjili and Y. Oji

Copyright © 2013 Stuart K. Calderwood. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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