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Scientifica
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 357805, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/357805
Review Article

Glial-Mediated Inflammation Underlying Parkinsonism

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Neuroscience & School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Campus de Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, 08193 Barcelona, Spain

Received 8 May 2013; Accepted 13 June 2013

Academic Editors: G. Chadi and E. Mufson

Copyright © 2013 Carlos Barcia. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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