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Scientifica
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 149187, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/149187
Review Article

Ionotropic GABA Receptors and Distal Retinal ON and OFF Responses

Department of Physiology, Medical Faculty, Medical University, 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria

Received 11 February 2014; Revised 24 April 2014; Accepted 27 May 2014; Published 20 July 2014

Academic Editor: Marco Sassoe-Pognetto

Copyright © 2014 E. Popova. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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