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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 601416, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/601416
Research Article

Physical Therapy Adjuvants to Promote Optimization of Walking Recovery after Stroke

Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Department of Health Science and Research and Division of Physical Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina, 77 President Street, MSC 700, Charleston, SC 29425, USA

Received 16 January 2011; Revised 6 July 2011; Accepted 13 July 2011

Academic Editor: Dorian Rose

Copyright © 2011 Mark G. Bowden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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