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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 712903, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/712903
Review Article

Hereditary Connective Tissue Diseases in Young Adult Stroke: A Comprehensive Synthesis

1Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
2Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent, Belgium

Received 15 September 2010; Revised 15 December 2010; Accepted 23 December 2010

Academic Editor: Turgut Tatlisumak

Copyright © 2011 Olivier M. Vanakker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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