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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 858134, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/858134
Review Article

Preeclampsia and Stroke: Risks during and after Pregnancy

1Department of Neurology, Medical Center Boulevard, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
2Stroke Center Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and Women's Health Center of Excellence for Research, Leadership, and Education, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 14 October 2010; Accepted 13 December 2010

Academic Editor: Halvor Naess

Copyright © 2011 Cheryl Bushnell and Monique Chireau. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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