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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 382146, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/382146
Review Article

Calcium and Potassium Channels in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Transient Global Ischemia

1Department for Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
2Institute for Neurophysiology, University of Cologne, Robert-Koch-Straße 39, 50931 Cologne, Germany
3Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne, Germany

Received 19 September 2012; Accepted 27 October 2012

Academic Editor: R. Loch Macdonald

Copyright © 2012 Marcel A. Kamp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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