About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 362961, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/362961
Research Article

Reducing Haemorrhagic Transformation after Thrombolysis for Stroke: A Strategy Utilising Minocycline

1Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia and School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
2Department of General Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA 6000, Australia
3Department of Neurology, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, WA 6160, Australia
4Stroke Unit, Swan District Hospital, Middle Swan WA 6056, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
5Department of Neurological Intervention and Imaging Service of Western Australia, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
6Stroke Unit, Swan District Hospital, Middle Swan, WA 6056, Australia
7Department of Neurology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth WA 6000, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
8Data Analysis Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia

Received 26 January 2013; Accepted 10 March 2013

Academic Editor: Majaz Moonis

Copyright © 2013 David J. Blacker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. Derex and N. Nighoghossian, “Intracerebral haemorrhage after thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke: an update,” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 79, no. 10, pp. 1093–1099, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. N. Wahlgren, N. Ahmed, A. Dávalos et al., “Thrombolysis with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Monitoring Study (SITS-MOST): an observational study,” The Lancet, vol. 369, no. 9558, pp. 275–282, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. W. Hacke, M. Kaste, C. Fieschi et al., “Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of thrombolytic therapy with intravenous alteplase in acute ischaemic stroke (ECASS II),” The Lancet, vol. 352, no. 9136, pp. 1245–1251, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke rt-PA Stroke Study Group, “Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischaemic stroke,” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 333, pp. 1581–1587, 1995.
  5. G. Thomalla, J. Sobesky, M. Köhrmann et al., “Two tales: hemorrhagic transformation but not parenchymal hemorrhage after thrombolysis is related to severity and duration of ischemia—MRI study of acute stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 6 hours,” Stroke, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 313–318, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. H. Park, Y. Ko, W. J. Kim, et al., “Is asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation really innocuous?” Neurology, vol. 78, pp. 421–426, 2012.
  7. G. A. Rosenberg, M. Navratil, F. Barone, and G. Feuerstein, “Proteolytic cascade enzymes increase in focal cerebral ischemia in rat,” Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 360–366, 1996. View at Scopus
  8. J. H. Heo, J. Lucero, T. Abumiya, J. A. Koziol, B. R. Copeland, and G. J. Del Zoppo, “Matrix metalloproteinases increase very early during experimental focal cerebral ischaemia,” Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, vol. 19, pp. 1020–1028, 1999.
  9. K. Tsuji, T. Aoki, E. Tejima et al., “Tissue plasminogen activator promotes matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation after focal cerebral ischemia,” Stroke, vol. 36, no. 9, pp. 1954–1959, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. Ning, K. L. Furie, W. J. Koroshetz et al., “Association between tPA therapy and raised early matrix metalloproteinase-9 in acute stroke,” Neurology, vol. 66, no. 10, pp. 1550–1555, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. Y. Murata, A. Rosell, R. H. Scannevin, K. J. Rhodes, X. Wang, and E. H. Lo, “Extension of the thrombolytic time window with minocycline in experimental stroke,” Stroke, vol. 39, no. 12, pp. 3372–3377, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. L. S. Machado, I. Y. Sazonova, A. Kozak et al., “Minocycline and tissue-type plasminogen activator for stroke: assessment of interaction potential,” Stroke, vol. 40, no. 9, pp. 3028–3033, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. Y. Lampl, M. Boaz, R. Gilad et al., “Minocycline treatment in acute stroke: an open-label, evaluator-blinded study,” Neurology, vol. 69, no. 14, pp. 1404–1410, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. C. Fagan, J. L. Waller, F. T. Nichols et al., “Minocycline to Improve Neurologic Outcome in Stroke (MINOS): a dose-finding study,” Stroke, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 2283–2287, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. V. Srivastava, A. Bhasin, R. Bhatia, et al., “Efficacy of minocycline in acute ischemic stroke: a single-blinded, placebo-controlled trial,” Neurology India, vol. 60, pp. 23–28, 2012.
  16. D. J. Blacker, D. Prentice, G. J. Hankey et al., “The Perth Intravenous Minocycline Stroke Study (PIMSS),” International Journal of Stroke, vol. 7, no. 5, supplement 1, 2012.
  17. D. J. Blacker, D. Prentice, G. J. Hankey et al., “The West Australian Intravenous Minocycline and tPA Stroke Study (WAIMATSS),” International Journal of Stroke, no. 13, supplement 1, 2012.
  18. D. C. Hess, V. J. Howard, and G. Howard, “Minocycline: the search for a community hospital acute stroke therapy,” Neurology India, vol. 60, pp. 1–2, 2012.