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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 612458, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/612458
Clinical Study

Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

1Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1V7
2Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, UHN, 550 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2A2
3Heart & Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N 3M5
4Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1V7
5Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology & Health Science, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
6Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1

Received 4 December 2012; Accepted 11 January 2013

Academic Editor: Stefan Schwab

Copyright © 2013 Sanjay K. Prajapati et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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