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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 214078, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/214078
Review Article

Mouse Models of Aneuploidy

1Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
2Division of Immune Cell Biology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, UK

Received 4 February 2011; Accepted 16 November 2011

Academic Editor: Adele Murrell

Copyright © 2012 Olivia Sheppard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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