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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 640389, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/640389
Review Article

Neurobiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Melatonin Deficiency and Dysfunction

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach Institute of Zoology and Anthropology, Georg August University, 37073 Göttingen, Germany

Received 3 November 2011; Accepted 5 January 2012

Academic Editor: Zeev Blumenfeld

Copyright © 2012 Rüdiger Hardeland. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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