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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 823493, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/823493
Review Article

Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

1Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Centro Universitario S/N, Cerro de las Campanas, Querétaro 76010, Mexico
2Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional de México, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro 76230, Mexico
3Department of Neurobiology and Behaviour, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4550, USA

Received 27 October 2011; Accepted 8 December 2011

Academic Editor: Jerrel Yakel

Copyright © 2012 Laura Cristina Berumen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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