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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 909547, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/909547
Research Article

Motion Streaks Do Not Influence the Perceived Position of Stationary Flashed Objects

1Cognitive Neuroscience Sector, International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA)—Via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste, Italy
2Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padua, Italy

Received 28 October 2011; Accepted 5 December 2011

Academic Editors: M. Rosa and H. Super

Copyright © 2012 Andrea Pavan and Rosilari Bellacosa Marotti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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