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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 694146, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/694146
Review Article

Biologic Complexity in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Developing Targeted Therapeutics

Department of Pediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Drive SW, Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA

Received 29 December 2012; Accepted 29 January 2013

Academic Editors: Y. Al-Tonbary, M. A. Badr, A. Mansour, and F. Tricta

Copyright © 2013 Beatrice E. Gee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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