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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 823289, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/823289
Research Article

Anxiolytic-Like Actions of Fatty Acids Identified in Human Amniotic Fluid

1Laboratorio de Neurofarmacología, Instituto de Neuroetología, Universidad Veracruzana, Avenue Dr. Luis Castelazo s/n Col. Industrial Las Ánimas, 91190 Xalapa, VER, Mexico
2Unidad Periférica Xalapa del Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas (UNAM), Xalapa, VER, Mexico

Received 19 February 2013; Accepted 11 April 2013

Academic Editors: R. T. Joffe and A. Spallone

Copyright © 2013 Rosa Isela García-Ríos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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