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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 347086, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/347086
Research Article

Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Its Lipopolysaccharide with In Vitro Culture of Respiratory Nasal Epithelium

1Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Applied and Environmental Sciences, Bogotá, Colombia
2GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, St George's Avenue, Weybridge, Surrey KT13 0DE, UK
3Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, National University of Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia

Received 21 November 2012; Revised 4 February 2013; Accepted 7 February 2013

Academic Editor: Jyoji Yamate

Copyright © 2013 Carolina Gallego et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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