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Advances in Artificial Intelligence
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 392868, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/392868
Review Article

Simulation of Human Episodic Memory by Using a Computational Model of the Hippocampus

1Department of Complex Systems, School of Systems Information Science, Future University—Hakodate, 116–2 Kamedanakano, Hakodate, Hokkaido 041–8655, Japan
2Laboratory for Dynamics of Emergent Intelligence, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Received 25 August 2009; Accepted 2 November 2009

Academic Editor: Alfons Schuster

Copyright © 2010 Naoyuki Sato and Yoko Yamaguchi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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