Table of Contents
Advances in Anesthesiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 562378, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/562378
Review Article

Mutations in Sodium Channel Gene SCN9A and the Pain Perception Disorders

1Center for Anesthesiology and Reanimatology, Clinical Center Niš, Bulevar Dr. Zorana Djindjića 48, 18000 Niš, Serbia
2Department for Anesthesia and Intensive Care, School of Medicine, University of Niš, Bulevar Dr. Zorana Djindjića 81, 18000 Niš, Serbia

Received 29 September 2014; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Sorin J. Brull

Copyright © 2015 Danica Marković et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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