Table of Contents
Advances in Anesthesiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9243587, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9243587
Research Article

Medication Errors among Physician-Assistants Anaesthesia

1Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Management, University of Cape Coast, School of Medical Sciences, Cape Coast, Ghana
2Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, School of Medical Sciences, Kumasi, Ghana
3Department of Surgery, Eye Unit, University of Ghana Medical School, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana

Received 16 December 2015; Revised 23 February 2016; Accepted 6 March 2016

Academic Editor: Jukka Kortelainen

Copyright © 2016 G. Amponsah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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