Table of Contents
Advances in Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 543974, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/543974
Review Article

Importance of Biofilms in Urinary Tract Infections: New Therapeutic Approaches

Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Edificio CEK-1a planta C/Roselló 149-153, 08036 Barcelona, Spain

Received 27 March 2014; Accepted 13 June 2014; Published 2 July 2014

Academic Editor: Octavio Franco

Copyright © 2014 Sara M. Soto. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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